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It’s been a busy week — it’s tough to keep up with all the cybersecurity news. We’ve collected some of the biggest cybersecurity stories from the week — from TechCrunch and afar — to keep you up to date with the latest hacks, privacy breaches and security stories you need to know.

Facebook now says its password leak affected ‘millions’ of Instagram users

TechCrunch: As all eyes were on attorney general William Barr giving his highly anticipated summary of the Mueller report out this week, Facebook was quietly updating a blog post it had published a month earlier, revising up the number of Instagram accounts affected by a years-long bug that stored passwords in plaintext. Facebook admitted that “millions” of accounts were affected and not “hundreds of thousands” as it had first estimated. It wasn’t a coincidence; it was a perfect opportunity for Facebook to bury bad news. CNN’s Donie O’Sullivan called it the “most cynical” thing Facebook has done since dropping its report detailing its role in a genocide in Myanmar the day before the U.S. midterm elections.

Utah bans police from searching digital data without a warrant

Forbes: Some good news for privacy advocates this week: a big Fourth Amendment loophole has been closed in the state of Utah. Previously, state law enforcement only required a subpoena to access someone’s digital content — including emails, pictures, video and audio — from internet and cloud providers. Now, following the introduction of HB 57, the Electronic Information or Data Privacy Act, police need a warrant based on probable cause. No more warrantless fishing expeditions allowed.